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Pro040

Precast Concrete Building Blocks made with Aggregates Derived from Constructions and Demolition Waste



Title: Precast Concrete Building Blocks made with Aggregates Derived from Constructions and Demolition Waste
Author(s): Soutsos
Paper category : conference
Book title: International RILEM Conference on the Use of Recycled Materials in Building and Structures
Editor(s): E. Vázquez, Ch. F. Hendriks and G.M.T. Janssen
Print-ISBN: 2-912143-52-7
e-ISBN: 2912143756
Publisher: RILEM Publications SARL
Publication year: 2004
Pages: 571 - 579
Total Pages: 9
Nb references: 5
Language: English


Abstract: The potential for using construction and demolition waste (C&DW) derived aggregate in
the manufacture of precast concrete building blocks is currently being investigated at the
University of Liverpool. A market research study has been carried out to determine the
economic viability of using C&DW derived aggregates in the production of concrete building
blocks. The availability and transportation costs of quarried and C&DW derived aggregates
have been compared and there appears to be scope for investigating the technical aspects, in
addition to the economic aspects, of the use of C&DW derived aggregates in the manufacture
of building blocks. The manufacturing process used in factories for large-scale production
involves a "vibro-compaction" casting procedure, using a relatively dry concrete mix with a
low cement content (.... 100 kg/m 3 ). Trials in the laboratory have replicated the manufacturing
process by using a specially modified pneumatic hammer drill to compact the concrete into
steel moulds to produce blocks with the same physical and mechanical properties as
commercial blocks. It has been found in this study that the physical characteristics of C&DW
aggregates adversely affect the mechanical properties of concrete blocks if coarse and fine
aggregate replacement levels above 20% are used. If the compressive strength is to be
maintained using C&DW derived aggregates at replacement level higher than 20% then the
cement content must be increased, with a consequential impact on the cost advantage of using
C&DW aggregate.


Online publication: 2004-09-29
Publication type : full_text
Public price (Euros): 0.00
doi: 10.1617/2912143756.063