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Particle size distribution of supplementary cementitious materials and crushed sand fines: perspectives for micro-proportioning



Author(s): Rolands Cepuritis and Stefan Jacobsen
Paper category: Proceedings of the International RILEM Conference Materials, Systems and Structures in Civil Engineering 2016 Segment on Fresh Concrete
Editor(s): Lars N. Thrane, Claus Pade, Oldrich Svec and Nicolas Roussel
ISBN: 978-2-35158-184-1
e-ISBN: 978-2-35158-185-8
Publisher: RILEM Publications SARL
Publication year: 2016
Pages: 12-21
Total Pages: 10
Language : English


Abstract: Our research has previously demonstrated that the composition of crushed sand aggregate fines can be controlled from an industrial perspective. These finding have resulted in development of the concrete micro-proportioning principle. The concrete micro-proportioning principle is a concrete mix design approach where the fine particle composition and particle size distribution (PSD) is adjusted by controlling and varying the aggregate fines (and eventually other mineral additives, cement and supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs)) smaller than about 250 μm. So far it has been demonstrated that the described concrete micro-proportioning approach can be applied, if the fine part of the crushed sand (<= 250 μm) is divided into several separate fractions by air classification, which can then be blended in different proportions, as needed, either at the ready-mix concrete (RMC) plant or at the crushed aggregate quarry. In this paper we review the PSD of various SCMs and compare them to PSDs of crushed sand fines after multiple-step air classification. We point to that crushed sand fines can be used with SCMs in micro-proportioning as supplement to obtain economical concrete and sustainable control of fresh concrete rheology in parallel to use of chemical admixtures. Further research to this end is indicated.


Online publication : 2016
Publication type : full_text
Public price (Euros) : 0.00


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