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Pro084-1

CONCRETES TO MEET SEVERE CONDITIONS



Author(s): György L. Balázs
Paper category: Proceedings
Book title: Proceedings of CONSEC13 Seventh International Conference on Concrete under Severe Conditions - Environment and Loading Volume I
Editor(s): Z.J. Li, W. Sun, C.W. Miao, K.Sakai, O.E. Gjřrv, N.Banthia
ISBN: 978-2-35158-124-7
e-ISBN: 978-2-35158-134-6
Publisher: RILEM Publications SARL
Publication year: 2013
Pages: 12-23
Total Pages: 961
Language : English


Abstract: Concrete structures are often subjected to severe loading conditions. Severe loading may indicate intensive physical loading (like impact, blast, low cycles fatigue, high cycles fatigue) or intensive environmental attacks (like chemical effects or high temperature) or the combination of them.
Advantage of concrete that its properties can be optimized according to the requirements in order to meet even severe conditions. E.g. energy absorption can be considerably increased by application of metallic fibres; polymeric fibres may contribute in controlling shrinkage or fire resistance, etc.
Fire, and high temperatures in general, provide one of the most severe conditions for concrete structures all over the world both from point of view of material behaviour as well as structural behaviour. This paper intends to review some important aspects of fire behaviour and fire resistance of concrete structures including recent results.
Compressive strength measurements are presented for different compositions of concretes with or without silica fume for temperatures up to 1000°C.
Fire behaviour of thin webbed roof girders are studied both experimentally and analytically for different concrete mixes in order to be able to avoid explosive spalling failure.
Finally the possible use of computer tomography (CT) is demonstrated to study the deterioration of a concrete tunnel lining that was subjected to 2 hours hydrocarbon fire.


Online publication : 2013
Publication type : full_text
Public price (Euros) : 0.00


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