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DESIGNING REINFORCED CONCRETE STRUCTURE LOCATED IN MADRID BY COMBINING DURABILITY AND LCA MODELING



Author(s): A. VENTURA, T. SENGA KIESSE, V-L. TA, S. BONNET
Paper category: Proceedings
Book title: CO2STO2019 - International Workshop CO2 Storage in Concrete
Editor(s): Assia Djerbi, Othman Omikrine-Metalssi, Teddy Fen-Chong
ISBN:
e-ISBN: 978-2-35158-232-9
Publisher: RILEM Publications SARL
Publication year: 2019
Pages: 57-67
Total Pages: 11
Language : English


Abstract: This paper presents a new sustainable design approach of Reinforced Concrete (RC) structure
submitted to aggressive environment as carbonation. Indeed corrosion of reinforcement in
concrete, induced by the ingress of carbon dioxide is the main cause for deterioration of RC
structures in huge city. Our approach simultaneously integrates a service life model and a Life
Cycle Assessment (LCA) model. The service life model is a meta-model based on Fick’s law
and using technical parameters (concrete compounds) and environmental parameters (T and
Relative humidity) as inputs. Only CEM I and II types, are tested in this paper because they
are the most commonly used commercial cements. This model calculates for different
scenarios (type of cement, cement strength class, W/C, Cmin...), following or not the EN 206-
1 recommendations, the concrete cover depth d of a RC structure designed to a targeted 100
years service life. The LCA model is used with a d x 1 m2 of concrete cover volume flow to
estimate the Global Warning Potential (GWP) of construction. Our approach is applied to a
case study of a RC structure for XC4 exposure class in Madrid (Spain), because this city
presents surrounding conditions that favour concrete carbonation: high levels of carbon dioxide
ambient concentration and the mean relative external humidity around 60%. The most
sustainable RC is obtained by comparing the GWP of scenarios based on equivalent threshold
of service life design requirement. Compared to a standard based approach, our performance
based approach shows that concrete cover depths can significantly be reduced using most
favourable technological parameters, especially type of cement and cement strength class.
For most favourable solutions, the reduction of GWP is important and is due to the reduction
of concrete cover depth that is in some cases lower than the cover requested by the standard.
Storage of CO2 by carbonation reduces GWP of around 25%.


Online publication : 2019
Publication type : full_text
Public price (Euros) : 0.00


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